Showcasing awesome stuff people are making on the web.

"We’re building the Internet the World Needs"

Mitchell Baker’s keynote presentation at Mozilla’s Summit 2013 on the Nature of Mozilla.

See the infamous New York Times Ad that started it all.

See the infamous New York Times Ad that started it all.

StopWatching.Us
Last week, we learned that the U.S. government is using secret surveillance programs to collect vast amounts of our personal data from Internet and phone companies.  If true, these revelations represent a stunning abuse of our basic right to privacy. Many troubling questions are being raised, including what this means for the future of the Internet. Here at Mozilla, we strongly believe that when users fear government surveillance or are unable to know when, how and why their private data is being collected and used, a free and open web becomes impossible.
That’s why Mozilla is launching StopWatching.Us — a campaign sponsored by a broad coalition of political and tech organizations. We’re calling on citizens and organizations from around the world to demand that the U.S. Congress reveal the full extent of the National Security Agency’s spying programs.
We don’t want an Internet where everything we do is secretly tracked, monitored and logged by companies or governments. And we don’t want a government whose actions are invisible and unaccountable.
Please add your name to the petition:https://stopwatching.us

StopWatching.Us

Last week, we learned that the U.S. government is using secret surveillance programs to collect vast amounts of our personal data from Internet and phone companies.  If true, these revelations represent a stunning abuse of our basic right to privacy. Many troubling questions are being raised, including what this means for the future of the Internet. Here at Mozilla, we strongly believe that when users fear government surveillance or are unable to know when, how and why their private data is being collected and used, a free and open web becomes impossible.

That’s why Mozilla is launching StopWatching.Us — a campaign sponsored by a broad coalition of political and tech organizations. We’re calling on citizens and organizations from around the world to demand that the U.S. Congress reveal the full extent of the National Security Agency’s spying programs.

We don’t want an Internet where everything we do is secretly tracked, monitored and logged by companies or governments. And we don’t want a government whose actions are invisible and unaccountable.

Please add your name to the petition:
https://stopwatching.us

Bugzilla for Webmaker
We use Bugzilla to work open and get stuff done
Webmaker, like many Mozilla projects, uses an issue tracker called Bugzilla for filing tickets and getting stuff done. These two new pages provide tips and tricks for filing bugs, and for getting the most out of Bugzilla:
Bugzilla for Webmaker — the best place to start. How to file a Webmaker bug, plus simple tweaks for making Bugzilla easier to use.
Bugzilla for Webmaker: PRO TIPS – for digging deeper. How to make it easier for users to file tickets, tagging, searching and tracking bugs, Frequently Asked Questions and more.
Anyone can create, comment or contribute to a ticket
We work open. Webmaker is an open source, non-profit project powered by a global community of friendly humans like you. Anyone can create a ticket, comment on a ticket, and contribute. Just because it’s called a “bug” doesn’t necessarily mean there’s something wrong. It could just be a to-do, or a suggestion. All your tickets are welcome — don’t worry if you’re doing it right. We’re a friendly community, and we want your ideas!

Bugzilla for Webmaker

We use Bugzilla to work open and get stuff done

Webmaker, like many Mozilla projects, uses an issue tracker called Bugzilla for filing tickets and getting stuff done. These two new pages provide tips and tricks for filing bugs, and for getting the most out of Bugzilla:

  1. Bugzilla for Webmakerthe best place to start. How to file a Webmaker bug, plus simple tweaks for making Bugzilla easier to use.
  2. Bugzilla for Webmaker: PRO TIPS for digging deeper. How to make it easier for users to file tickets, tagging, searching and tracking bugs, Frequently Asked Questions and more.

Anyone can create, comment or contribute to a ticket

We work open. Webmaker is an open source, non-profit project powered by a global community of friendly humans like you. Anyone can create a ticket, comment on a ticket, and contribute. Just because it’s called a “bug” doesn’t necessarily mean there’s something wrong. It could just be a to-do, or a suggestion. All your tickets are welcome — don’t worry if you’re doing it right. We’re a friendly community, and we want your ideas!

15 Years of a Better Web
Mozilla exists to promote openness, innovation and opportunity on the Internet. We’ve been doing it for 15 years and the following 15 facts offer a look at who we are, including some of our biggest achievements and milestones. But in some ways we’re just getting started, exploring new technology, entering new areas and reaching new users every day.
Find out 15 facts about Mozilla:http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/contribute

15 Years of a Better Web

Mozilla exists to promote openness, innovation and opportunity on the Internet. We’ve been doing it for 15 years and the following 15 facts offer a look at who we are, including some of our biggest achievements and milestones. But in some ways we’re just getting started, exploring new technology, entering new areas and reaching new users every day.

Find out 15 facts about Mozilla:
http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/contribute

May your gifts shine and your celebrations be merry!

image

Follow this link to make a Webmaker Thimble Greeting:
https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/fqvr/edit

Or you can start from scratch:
https://thimble.webmaker.org/en-US/editor

See you in the New Year, Webmakers!


Doing good is part of our code. We are a non-profit, which means we can keep our focus squarely on our mission — but that also means that we need your support to keep us going. 
Please watch The Mozilla Story to see how we’ve always taken a stand for users and protected the Web in a world where choice and control are too often at risk. 
We’ve got a lot more work to do, and we need your help to keep moving forward. Help us build a better web by donating $30 and get a great Firefox shirt, or the shirt shown above. 
Building a better world — one where users have control over their personal data and the freedom to create and to consume content without overzealous restrictions — means building a better Web, together. 

Thank you, Mark
Mark SurmanExecutive DirectorMozilla Foundation

Doing good is part of our code.

We are a non-profit, which means we can keep our focus squarely on our mission — but that also means that we need your support to keep us going.

Please watch The Mozilla Story to see how we’ve always taken a stand for users and protected the Web in a world where choice and control are too often at risk.

We’ve got a lot more work to do, and we need your help to keep moving forward. Help us build a better web by donating $30 and get a great Firefox shirt, or the shirt shown above.

Building a better world — one where users have control over their personal data and the freedom to create and to consume content without overzealous restrictions — means building a better Web, together.


Thank you,
Mark

Mark Surman
Executive Director
Mozilla Foundation

Mozilla in 2012

2012 was an incredible year for Mozilla. We mobilized. We did a better job than I have ever seen us do identifying the places where we needed to have impact, and then we focused and delivered. There’s a lot for us all to be proud of in 2012; I’ve gathered up a few of my favourites.Read Jonathan Nightingale’s Year in Review:https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2012/12/14/mozilla-in-2012

Mozilla in 2012

2012 was an incredible year for Mozilla. We mobilized. We did a better job than I have ever seen us do identifying the places where we needed to have impact, and then we focused and delivered. There’s a lot for us all to be proud of in 2012; I’ve gathered up a few of my favourites.

Read Jonathan Nightingale’s Year in Review:
https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2012/12/14/mozilla-in-2012

The ITU could put the Internet behind closed doors.

Watch the video to find out how.

In collaboration with Access Now and Fight for the Future, we’ve put together an interactive video about the ITU that you can customize for your own needs and share with others. Just click here and you’ll be editing your own video in minutes.

If making a Popcorn video isn’t your thing you could write a blog post, share your message on social media, or just start talking to your friends in your local community about what’s going on.

Use hashtags: #ITU #WCIT #freeandopen

Make-your-own ITU Activism Video
Internet governance is a big, international issue. There is an amazing and diverse collection of opinions around what our governments should decide when they gather at the ITU meeting in Dubai in December. This Popcorn Maker project helps us—the web—speak in one voice while celebrating the plurality of languages and viewpoints that make the web such an amazing place to be.

To do that, we’re launching an experiment: in collaboration with  Access Now and Fight for the Future, we’ve cut a short video that explains the ITU and why it’s important that our voices be heard. But this is no ordinary video—we’ve loaded the ITU activism video into Mozilla Popcorn Maker, where you’ll be able to easily personalize, remix, and share the content of the video.
Try these ideas out:
1. Translate the video into your local language
2. Change the tone or content of the message
3. Customize the call to action
When you’re finished, click ‘Share’ to get a link or embed code you can add to your site or share with your friends.Try it now - it works right in your browser:https://www.webmaker.org/en-US/projects/roll-your-own-itu-activism-video

Make-your-own ITU Activism Video

Internet governance is a big, international issue. There is an amazing and diverse collection of opinions around what our governments should decide when they gather at the ITU meeting in Dubai in December. This Popcorn Maker project helps us—the web—speak in one voice while celebrating the plurality of languages and viewpoints that make the web such an amazing place to be.

To do that, we’re launching an experiment: in collaboration with Access Now and Fight for the Future, we’ve cut a short video that explains the ITU and why it’s important that our voices be heard. But this is no ordinary video—we’ve loaded the ITU activism video into Mozilla Popcorn Maker, where you’ll be able to easily personalize, remix, and share the content of the video.

Try these ideas out:

1. Translate the video into your local language


2. Change the tone or content of the message


3. Customize the call to action


When you’re finished, click ‘Share’ to get a link or embed code you can add to your site or share with your friends.

Try it now - it works right in your browser:
https://www.webmaker.org/en-US/projects/roll-your-own-itu-activism-video

The ITU and You
The Internet has always been guided forwards by collaborative, openapproaches. We believe that these approaches are one of the reasonswhy the web has become and remained the wonderful, powerful andempowering place we know today. In the coming weeks, this successfulmodel of governing and shaping the future of the web will be at risk.Today, we’re launching a kit of tools and resources to inform andmobilize the Internet community about what’s happening at theInternational Telecommunications Union (ITU) and support people intaking grassroots action. Mozilla stands behind transparency inInternet governance, but a free and open Internet depends on you.On December 3rd, nations from around the world will be meeting inDubai for the World Conference on International Telecommunications(WCIT), a meeting of the ITU. These governments will be meeting behindclosed doors to determine if an old treaty will be amended to allowcountries the power to more fully regulate and control the structureof the web.Whether the Internet is regulated by governmental treaties via the ITUand to what extent, is a vitally critical question. In fact it is socritical it can’t be done behind closed doors. The Internet as we knowit today is just too fundamental to our lives to leave it togovernments to decide its fateMozilla’s mission is to promote openess, innovation and opportunity onthe web. We do this first and foremost by building great products.But, as any Mozillian knows — the story is much more than the latestrelease or coolest hack. The Internet depends critically on a humannetwork of communities and relationships, and Mozilla builds movementsthat strengthen the web.The resources we are making available today will give you everythingyou need to learn about the upcoming meeting and why it matters, craftan effective message to get your government to listen, and engage inthe global conversation about how decisions about the future of theweb should be made.
Click here to get started!

The ITU and You


The Internet has always been guided forwards by collaborative, open
approaches. We believe that these approaches are one of the reasons
why the web has become and remained the wonderful, powerful and
empowering place we know today. In the coming weeks, this successful
model of governing and shaping the future of the web will be at risk.

Today, we’re launching a kit of tools and resources to inform and
mobilize the Internet community
about what’s happening at the
International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and support people in
taking grassroots action. Mozilla stands behind transparency in
Internet governance, but a free and open Internet depends on you.

On December 3rd, nations from around the world will be meeting in
Dubai for the World Conference on International Telecommunications
(WCIT), a meeting of the ITU. These governments will be meeting behind
closed doors to determine if an old treaty will be amended to allow
countries the power to more fully regulate and control the structure
of the web.

Whether the Internet is regulated by governmental treaties via the ITU
and to what extent, is a vitally critical question. In fact it is so
critical it can’t be done behind closed doors. The Internet as we know
it today is just too fundamental to our lives to leave it to
governments to decide its fate

Mozilla’s mission is to promote openess, innovation and opportunity on
the web. We do this first and foremost by building great products.
But, as any Mozillian knows — the story is much more than the latest
release or coolest hack. The Internet depends critically on a human
network of communities and relationships, and Mozilla builds movements
that strengthen the web.

The resources we are making available today will give you everything
you need to learn about the upcoming meeting and why it matters, craft
an effective message to get your government to listen, and engage in
the global conversation about how decisions about the future of the
web should be made.

Click here to get started!

One of the most amazing stories from the Summer Code Party continues:Unnati the Webmaker, who once ran into trouble while working on a Thimble project, and Gauthramraj the Mentor, who created novel ways for her to solve problems has another chapter!From Gauthramraj:"Hey all,
    Unnati was asked to make a webpage for an exhibition and as expected she simply rocked :-) Here is the link https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/2c0 ! I am sure you all will love it ! To make the things more interesting , I asked Unnati to try with her school if she can do a mozparty in her school with her friends. She got the permission and will be hosting a Mozparty day after tomorrow. Also, I have sent her few mozparty and Firefox goodies by courier to make her event more awesome :-) “
We are wildly impressed with the both of them! Congratulations, Unnati!The story starts here:http://www.zythepsary.com/techie/the-power-of-contribution
Gauthramraj creates a project just to help Unnati (you can try it too):http://mozillawebmaker.tumblr.com/post/30666021305/solve-gauthamrajelas-alice-puzzle-project
Unnati thanks her mentors:https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/9ha
Unnati hosts her first HackJam with two of her friends and her cousin, and makes Popcorn:http://maker.mozillapopcorn.org/505ed17aa640e28e060007a0.html

One of the most amazing stories from the Summer Code Party continues:

Unnati the Webmaker, who once ran into trouble while working on a Thimble project, and Gauthramraj the Mentor, who created novel ways for her to solve problems has another chapter!

From Gauthramraj:

"Hey all,

    Unnati was asked to make a webpage for an exhibition and as expected she simply rocked :-) Here is the link https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/2c0 ! I am sure you all will love it ! To make the things more interesting , I asked Unnati to try with her school if she can do a mozparty in her school with her friends. She got the permission and will be hosting a Mozparty day after tomorrow. Also, I have sent her few mozparty and Firefox goodies by courier to make her event more awesome :-) “


We are wildly impressed with the both of them! Congratulations, Unnati!


The story starts here:
http://www.zythepsary.com/techie/the-power-of-contribution

Gauthramraj creates a project just to help Unnati (you can try it too):
http://mozillawebmaker.tumblr.com/post/30666021305/solve-gauthamrajelas-alice-puzzle-project

Unnati thanks her mentors:
https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/9ha

Unnati hosts her first HackJam with two of her friends and her cousin, and makes Popcorn:
http://maker.mozillapopcorn.org/505ed17aa640e28e060007a0.html

Introducing the 2012 Mozilla Festival: making, freedom and the web

Join us for three days of inspired making, learning and celebration in London. Today we’re extremely proud to launch the new 2012 Mozilla Festival web site — and invite you to join us November 9-11 in London, UK.

“We want everyone to tap the full creative power of the web. The Mozilla Festival is a magnet for people interested in learning about — and playing with — the web’s future.” –Mark Surman, Executive Director, Mozilla

Gathering educators, youth, coders, gamers, media-makers and you
This year’s Mozilla Festival will gather more than 800 passionate people with diverse backgrounds and skill-sets. The goal: push the frontiers of the open web, learn together, and make things that can change the world.
Coders, designers, journalists and educators will join with filmmakers, gamers, makers and youth from more than 40 different countries. Together they’ll participate in a series of design challenges, learning labs and fireside chats spread across four floors of the Ravensbourne design and media campus in East London.
Find out more:https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2012/09/18/mozfest-2012

Introducing the 2012 Mozilla Festival: making, freedom and the web


Join us for three days of inspired making, learning and celebration in London. Today we’re extremely proud to launch the new 2012 Mozilla Festival web site — and invite you to join us November 9-11 in London, UK.

We want everyone to tap the full creative power of the web. The Mozilla Festival is a magnet for people interested in learning about — and playing with — the web’s future.” –Mark Surman, Executive Director, Mozilla

Gathering educators, youth, coders, gamers, media-makers and you

This year’s Mozilla Festival will gather more than 800 passionate people with diverse backgrounds and skill-sets. The goal: push the frontiers of the open web, learn together, and make things that can change the world.

Coders, designers, journalists and educators will join with filmmakers, gamers, makers and youth from more than 40 different countries. Together they’ll participate in a series of design challenges, learning labs and fireside chats spread across four floors of the Ravensbourne design and media campus in East London.

Find out more:
https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2012/09/18/mozfest-2012

For anyone following the story of one of our most inspiring MozReps, Gauthramraj Elango, we’re very happy to share this wonderful creation by Unnati, the little girl who got stuck, asked for help, and met a virtual ‘Alice’ to help her finish her project. We’re very impressed with them both and believe they deserve our strongest Kudos.

Find out how the story started:http://www.zythepsary.com/techie/the-power-of-contributionVisit the project that “Alice” (Gathramraj) made to help Unnati:https://wiki.mozilla.org/Webmakers/Projects/PicturePuzzleSee Unnati’s thank you:https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/9haTry the Inanimate Alice project yourself:https://webmaker.org/en-US/projects/make-your-own-episode-inanimate-alice

For anyone following the story of one of our most inspiring MozReps, Gauthramraj Elango, we’re very happy to share this wonderful creation by Unnati, the little girl who got stuck, asked for help, and met a virtual ‘Alice’ to help her finish her project.

We’re very impressed with them both and believe they deserve our strongest Kudos.

Find out how the story started:
http://www.zythepsary.com/techie/the-power-of-contribution

Visit the project that “Alice” (Gathramraj) made to help Unnati:
https://wiki.mozilla.org/Webmakers/Projects/PicturePuzzle

See Unnati’s thank you:
https://thimble.webmaker.org/p/9ha

Try the Inanimate Alice project yourself:
https://webmaker.org/en-US/projects/make-your-own-episode-inanimate-alice


'A reading list for Webmakers', Mark Surman

People often ask: Where did Mozilla Webmaker come from? And, how does it fit into the big picture of Mozilla’s mission? There are loads of materials online that answer these questions. I figured I should create a ‘reading’ list for would be web makers that pulls together some of the main threads. Here it is.

1. The Story of Mozilla

This video is a great place to start. In 3 minutes, you get primer on how Mozilla used Firefox to keep the web alive and on where we are headed next with mobile and web literacy. The main take away: Mozilla is a global community of people creates compelling products and experiences that build openness into the internet. This is an important foundational idea to get. It’s how Mozilla thinks about itself.

Read more…
http://commonspace.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/a-reading-list-for-webmakers